Regarding personalization


The last Experts video underlined the importance of variation (don’t say the same thing twice) and personalization/context (use info you already have to make things more natural).
I got a question regarding the second aspect: Say I use skill A that asks me for my dog’s name (imagine it’s a dog training skill), and that skill stores the information so it can refer to the dog by its name for every revisit.
Now, say I use another dog-related skill (e.g. dog food ordering), will this skill be aware of skill A’s information about my dog’s name? If not, I can imagine it becoming cumbersome to the user as he/she views Jibo as one entity that should know once you told it. If indeed it is shared, will there be privacy safeguards? Just because the Domino’s skill has my CC number and address, can’t mean the “raunchy joke of the day” skill does, right?

Overall this of course leads into the much bigger question of how Jibo will maintain a cohesive personality when so many cooks will be involved.


Hey @kwebster,

Each skill will have its own sandboxed knowledge base to store information across sessions of that skill only, (as mentioned in this [post] (Will Jibo have a sense of space at home and know where he is if told?) ) and will not be accessible for other skills to use.

We are also considering solutions for the problem you mentioned (sharing of structured information about users for the purposes of personalization and consistency across skills, like pets, dietary restrictions, etc.). This is pretty early stage, so you shouldn’t make your skill dependent on having this functionality.

For now, our Design, Speech, and Brand Style Guides is currently the best way to make sure your skills maintain Jibo’s character. We will have more information available in future releases of the SDK.


The dog name is a good example, but there can’t be that many dog skills. I’d actually worry about information not being shared.

I think back the simple pizza skill, where Jibo said the kid had an allergy to olives. That’s great that Jibo reminded them, but in the current state, the parents would have to tell every food ordering skill, cooking skill, and grocery list skill. Pretty annoying to do that, there could be dozens of those skills. Not only that, what if they missed 1 or 2, and someone got peanuts in their Chinese order, ultimately the parents fault, but are they going to trust Jibo again? There really should be something outside of the skills, if Jibo has a personality, if we are to think of him as a character, I’d have to say sharing structured information is pretty important.


I absolutely agree, and feel we should have a list of shared data that our skills could access for consistent awareness between skills.


@joe.t, thanks for the links!

An immediate follow-up from the Speech document, I was surprised by this statement:

" [Jibo] doesn’t use the phrase ‘his’ or ‘her’."

Is that a requirement coming out of the fact that we (skill developers) won’t know who is part of the household, or what their genders are?

EDIT: BTW, if I come across as the pesky guy who asks annoying questions on this forum, I apologise. I personally am not too interested in HTML5 animations etc, that for me (not in any way discounting the amount of work that goes into making that work) is just “mechanics”. For me the interesting part is how Jibo in its current design will come together as the envisioned whole, the likeable, social character we all want it to be. That to me is the part that will set apart Jibo from all the others “smart speakers” out there. I must confess, answers regarding this key differentiator have been very handwavy.


@kwebster Our style guides and documentation will continue to be updated in future updates of the SDK. Because the solutions we are considering, the current guideline recommendation is to not make you skill dependent on referencing the user’s data, such as gender, until it is available. We will share these updated apis and documentation with you as soon as they are ready.

@Timothy I think you laid out the problem nicely and why structured information is important. When it is done right, it adds this personal depth of experience to Jibo skills that is unique, as Andrew explained in his recent Expert Connect and blog post. If it is implemented incorrectly and haphazardly, there is way more at stake because it can break the experience, trust, and user privacy. This is why we need to make sure the right solution is in place with proper documentation and guides before they are available for use.